Bus Skin for Roos-N-More

For my artifact, I decided to do a couple of bus skins highlighting the existence of the zoo we chose to work with. With the zoo being located in Moapa, NV and knowing that many local students didn’t know of its existence we decided that our target audience would be men and women age 18-26 located in the Southern Utah area.

(Sidenote, the rest of the campaign, along with the style guide and such can be found at http://pbrandoj.wix.com/rooszoocomm3560)

Why a bus skin? Here’s my reasoning. Near campus, there is a major ‘hub’ for the SunTran bus system, where buses typically idle for a few minutes at a time. Many students pass these buses during busy commute times and would see them. Also, because of the color scheme chosen for our campaign, I knew that something that was a shade of bright green as big as a bus would stand out from anything else and pull peoples attention.

Because buses move, and people pass them quickly; it needed to be visually catchy while also having an element of simplicity. Two of our major communication objectives were to promote awareness of the existence of the zoo in Moapa and to instill a desire for people to learn more about the zoo, so in order to accomplish that I wanted to make sure that the logo and zoo name were featured prominently as to easily be seen. The website address is simple and featured in a contrasting font color to make sure it stands out and is easily legible. Social Media icons were featured as a decently large part near the website address in order to give people a quick alternate way of looking up information about the zoo.

An Asymmetrical balance was an important design aspect of these skins to create the feeling of fun and quirkiness. I also wanted to use the photos and their natural vectors to move people’s eyes toward the text. The lemur in the first photo is staring right at the social media icons and website address, and the hand feeding the kangaroo in the second image points your eye towards the main slogan and website address.
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Contextual Impact of Social Media and "Count My Vote"

Politics.  It’s such a dirty word among people right now. People don’t like politics; they try to avoid it as much as possible. It used to be that you could tune politics out; simply ignore it and pretend it doesn’t apply to you.


All that has changed now.

Politics are more prevalent that ever before, and its no longer a ‘one-way’ street. With the advent of social networking, politics have become much more personalized, giving people an outlet to which they can freely speak.

A new movement recently started here in Utah, the “Count My Vote” initiative.  In brief, this movement aims to switch Utah’s current primary election system from a Caucus system (where chosen delegates cast votes in a primary election) to a direct vote primary (where every participant has a vote in the primary election). Many other states have a direct primary, so this is nothing new or groundbreaking. The timing of this initiative, however, is rather curious. Why now? Why has this not come up in the past? According to a study cited by Count My Vote on their website, Utah’s voting turnout in elections has dropped sharply from 76% to 39% in 2012, ranking the state #39 in voter turnout.

Usage of social media has increased exponentially over the past few years. According to a study by the Pew Research Center, 72% of adults are social network users (see the full report here).

But what does this mean, and how does it relate to the Count My Vote movement?

One principle of social networking that always seems to keep reoccurring is the idea of one being their own personal gatekeeper to surround oneself with views affirming their own. This principle is highlighted extremely well in any political discussion you can see on Facebook, with at least two clear camps in opposition to each other duking it out through their keyboards. The end result? People can now feel like they have a voice; an opinion (albeit sometimes absurd). What happens now that people have all of these opinions and passions about current issues? They want to be the decision makers; the influencers. And that idea lies at the heart of the Count My Vote initiative. You don’t want someone else, who may or may not share your same viewpoint voting for the people who represent you. You want that vote, and ultimately that decision.

Obviously, the impact of this event has implications in a few different contexts.  First (and most obviously) within the social context. Voting and primary system in Utah is something that has been happening in our society for a long time. With the way people

Culturally, this has been an interesting movement. Just because of its nature, being an petition-based movement it has a very grass-roots feel to it. Social networking has been incredibly important to it’s progress. I first heard about this movement through a blog post that was linked to on my friends Facebook wall. The discussion, according to my experience has mainly been happening online. There is discussion that happens face to face, but most of the time people will steer clear of any situation where it looks like someone is going to talk politics (like a group of people wanting signatures for a petition). Online, however you can say whatever you want, leave out any details you want and ignore anyone you want.  This discussion that happens is very much a form of citizen journalism. Many people have heard of the movement from the news, but a whole lot more is being said by people outside of traditional news media through the blogs and Facebook/Twitter posts.

My view?  I think this movement has some merit behind it. Reforming Utah’s system to a direct primary would definitely have many implications, but we wouldn’t be the first to do so.  In our day and age, political candidates have much easier means to connect with people one on one, even if its not face to face.  I can see the reasoning as to why we had delegates vote for us in the past; it would have been impossible for candidates to broadcast their message that far and wide. But today I can send a tweet to my state representatives and have a response back; I can look up their voting history online to see if I agree with their views. So much information is out there now that I feel confident enough I could make an educated, direct vote about who I want to represent me, instead of letting someone else do it for me. After all, if I’m going to post about who I want in office anyway on Facebook, it might as well count in real life too.

Facebook Page Evaluation

Well… Can’t believe that we’re to this point in the semester already.

Here’s my evaluation of the Facebook page I managed this semester. I will continue to manage it throughout the next semester too, so hopefully I’ll be able to apply some of the things I’ve learned in hindsight this semester.

First off, the theme.  That was the first thing I tackled when I gained control of this page.  My goal was to modernize it, show the logo and give it a warmer and more inviting feel.

Original Page

Updated Page

I thought about other social networking apps I could use to further the reach of the campaign, but ultimately decided to stay with my original thought and keep Facebook as the primary online presence for this business.

I have some other graphics that I plan on using for the cover photo, but didn’t see a need to change it frequently yet. When we get closer to the end of the year there will be a larger push from the management to do more, but because they are full they were hesitant to do too much recruiting right now.

I think that the theme of this page with the bright red logo and nicely framed cover photo have done a lot to legitimize the presence of the brand I tried to create. I would have liked to see a little more variation in the cover photo (as I stated), but hope to work on that over the semester break and into next year.

My tactic of posting photos seemed to work really well in terms of engaging people.  A handful of likes came from the class, but a lot of the 25+ increase in likes came from people engaging on the photos uploaded.  I was able to get some really nice photos from a photographer the mangers commissioned to update the photos. These proved invaluable for engagement, often doubling the reach of the page.  I wanted to post some things about resident life, but to be completely honest, there wasn’t much going on the past few months. The closest I got to that tactic was posting construction progress of the new pool/hot tub area at the new complex.

Here’s a quick look at the metrics from the beginning of September until the beginning of December:

Total Page “Likes”


Days the “Likes” increased
What kind of post resonated most with my audience
Most Successful Post
All Posts Since I took over the page


Compose My Frame

While I was looking through the photos on my iPhone for an assignment for another class, I found an image that I knew I could crop and adjust to fit all the criteria for this assignment. I’ve posted the original photo at the end of this post as reference. This photo was taken on my spring break trip last semester to Oceanside, California. The local pier was very photogenic and provided some awesome sunset views.
When composing the frame, I used the rule of thirds to set the horizon and focal point.  Typically the sky would only fill a third of the frame, but because I really wanted the setting sun to be the focal point (located at the lower left intersection of the rule of thirds grid) so the horizon is set at the lower third, leaving the beautiful colors of the sunset to fill the negative space in the upper two-thirds.
With the diagonal rule, I had two choices: either set the pier at a diagonal or the beach.  Because I wanted the pier and the horizon to be level, I decided to make the beach at an angle. Dynamically, this gives the image a sense of depth and distance, showing that the beach continues beyond the frame.
There is one major vector in this photo, and that’s the pier.  I experimented with different crops, some that didn’t show an end to the pier, but in the end, I really wanted the frame to suggest the motion out to sea. This vector provides a strong focal point right above the horizon line and leads the eye out to sea, towards the setting sun. In some senses its a graphic vector because of the architectural details, but in a way its a motion vector because of the way it guides your eye from right to left.
Original Image before cropping and framing adjustments

Hugo (Group Presentation Post)


Production Design by Dante Ferretti
Cinematography by Robert Richardson 


Costume Design:

Line:

Because the movie is intended to be seen through the eyes of a child, there were no more than two costumes for each character, and costume designs were simple. Stripes were used on a handful of the costumes, including Hugo’s and Isabelle’s sweaters. Similarly, Madame Emilie’s coat and skirt had a zig-zag pattern. These particular patterns made it easy for the characters to stand out amongst the crowds in the station. As stated on the class blog, lines “lead your eye around the composition and can communicate information through their character and direction.”

Form:

Similar to line, form is apparent throughout the rectangular shape of the lines of Hugo and Isabelle’s sweaters. The station inspector’s hat has an almost zig-zag pattern, which also adds depth to his costume. Color: Color was one of the most important aspects of costume design. One of the most prominent examples of color is illustrated by the station inspector’s blue uniform. Powell described that a typical station inspector’s uniform would be navy. However, navy would appear black on screen, so she exaggerated the intensity of the blue in his uniform to assure he would stand out on camera. The value of the blue is also associated with energy, which is perfect because the station inspector is constantly chasing Hugo, as well as other orphans, around the station. 
Similar to the station inspector’s uniform, Hugo’s costume featured an intensified blue color, as well as shades of burgundy, orange and brown. Isabelle’s costume was made of navy and burgundy, creating a “French” look. These colors are dull, portraying a serious mood. Isabelle’s outfit matches well against Hugo’s, which is important as the two characters are beside each other a majority of the movie. Together, the reds, oranges and browns are warm colors, while the blues are cool colors. 

Texture:

There was plenty of knitwear throughout the differing costumes, as well as wool, heavy overcoats, hats and scarves. The film is set in the 1930s but includes costume designs from the 1920s as well. The winter coats and hats takes viewers to that specific time period. When I think of running my fingers along Hugo’s coat, I imagine it and his shirt to be rough, as if he’s worn these clothes a hundred times without a single wash. Isabelle’s coat seems to have a leathery texture, accounting for the wealth her family has. 

Gestalt Principles

Law of Similarity:

Hugo and Isabelle’s clothes are similar in color and pattern, making it easy to group the children together. 

Law of Continuity:

The horizontal lines in the stripes of Hugo and Isabelle’s sweaters imply continuation. This is especially important as Hugo and Isabelle move from scene to scene but remain in character. 

Contexts

Social:

Hugo’s costume puts the viewer in the most obvious social context. His clothes were purposely too small, giving an illusion that he is alone and has no one to look after him or provide him with new clothes. 

Cultural:

The setting is 1930s Paris, intending a “French” culture. This is most obvious in Isabelle’s costume, as the colors are explained to create a “French” look.

Set Design:

When Martin Scorsese asked Dante Ferretti to be the Production Designer on Hugo he couldn’t say no. They had been working on Shutter Island when the opportunity to do Hugocame about. Scorsese and Ferretti have also worked on The Aviator, as well as Gangs of New York just to name a few. With some sketches from the book to work with Dante went to the Gar de Lyon in Paris to get an idea of how he was going to create Paris in that time. Martin wanted to create a world with bits and pieces of clock everywhere so the attention to detail was paramount, they built the entire train station in England at Shepperton Studios.The entire set was made from scratch except for a few scenes where they were actually in Paris. Ferretti says in an interview that they had to build a station to fit the 1920’s – 1930’s era. With this being a 3-D movie having their own station made things a lot easier when filming; they couldn’t shut down an entire station for as long as they needed and having their own gave them the freedom to what they needed. As you watch this movie you see just how much effort went into the set to make everything as perfect as it could be, you really feel as if they are in early 20th century Paris.
Having an already great idea on how the set was supposed to look like, the use of design principles are found throughout the film. One of the more impacting design principles used is line. When you think about a train station, you automatically think of the tracks and where it will fit among the people milling about the station, or at least I do. Looking at the picture above there are two parallel almost complete horizontal lines that create separation from the two main characters (Hugo and Isabelle). There are many other lines from the lamp posts, to the columns, and also to the bars that make up the window panes in the ceiling. Space was also something that was needed for this film, with it being in 3-D the way that the camera has to be moved needed a lot of space that wouldn’t have been practical in a real world functioning station.
Continuity has been used right from the very beginning of the film in the idea that everything works like a clock with the affect of having Paris work the many gears that create a clock. These gears are seen in many places, not just when the characters are inside them. We also use pragnanz when looking at gears because we only see circles when so much more is going on with them.
The context for the train station is a historical one. It would be very difficult to use a modern train station and make it fit the time and the feel of the story. Like it was said before it would be very hard to close down an entire train station and film the movie.

Visual Effects Design:

The visual effects in Hugo are pretty incredible. Much of the acting work was done on real, practical sets built specially for the movie; however even the most complex sets needed some digital finishing. I had to place the visual effects credits for this movie at the end of this post, because the credits are HUGE. Amazingly, each of those people listed below had to be on the same page for what they were trying to accomplish in this film, and it was done beautifully.
The frame above shows quite clearly a few visual aspects which were finished off by the visual effects crew. In conjunction with the set designer, the visual effect of closing in the roof of the station had to be accomplished by the Gestalt principle of closure. These settings needed to be drawn on computer to match the physical sets, but also fade neatly into a stylized, almost whimsical steampunk look.
A before and after still from a scene later in the movie (though in the same space as the clip we chose) shows how much was done to make the station look complete:



(All images copyright © 2011 Paramount Pictures.)

From the perspective of design, the visual effects crew needed to take the lines and perspective of the basic set design and continue them in order to build the context of the film. In almost every one of these scenes, the use of line shows depth.
As with the set and costume design, the visual effects artists used color very carefully, in order to keep the mood of the overall scene. Colors in the train station are muted, while maintaining a certain warm glow.
Form is also important, and comes into play in many of the scenes. You see many geometric shapes in the station, from the columns to the lights to the speakers and down to the windows and archways. The forms are three dimensional and the way they are lit make the 3-D space very real.
The visual effects designers also needed to play on a few different contexts to make this scene work. Psychologically, the visual effects artists make you feel like you’ve been knocked down like the girl in the scene, using vertical lines and a vertical vanishing point while showing her face looking up. It seems like it shouldn’t work, but it is very effective:


In the scene above, you also get a glimpse at how the visual effects artists used figure-ground relationships, using the peoples feet as the figures and the ground as the roof behind them.
The visual effects artists also use texture well; creating a cold, hard feeling atmosphere, accentuated by the use of real (and CGI) steam.

Director of Photography:

The photography of this movie is splendid. Scenes are set up to be visually stunning. This scene in particular holds a great amount of visual depth. It is laid out with the rule of thirds with the children in the foreground so you notice them first. The inspector is on a third so the eye is drawn to him next. The children are set apart from the background by the distance and the design on the floor. I don’t know if the design was intentional, but it looks good. It follows the law of proximity where the main characters stand out from the rest of the groups. The people in the background are moving which creates some motion vector though they are moving in different directions so it makes it more jumbled. There is so much color in the scene, but they all follow a theme of blues, reds, and yellows. This is a theme that continues through the whole movie.
The lighting of the scene is also quite good with the ceiling lights creating a back light that pulls the children out of the group and into the foreground and the light is warm which follows the color scheme.The costumes follow the same color scheme with browns, blues, and reds. The clothing of the children has more color and pattern then the others on set which also makes them stand out along with the blue of the inspector. This follows the law of similarity where the three stand out because of their differences. This continues through the rest of the scene even when she falls and is saved by hugo. It also plays on the social aspects of children being alone in comparison the rest of the adults in the station. The whole movie plays on the idea of the children being set apart from the adults.
The DP of this film has done many other movies, some with the same director, but I haven’t really seen any of them. It would seem that this movie is quite different from his usual though because it is a brighter, family film while most of his other films are darker, less kid friendly, films. It this scene where she falls and looks like she is going to get trampled, the DP plays with the phycological fear by showing her face and her fear and the people towering over her. That is about as dark and scary as the movie gets.

Visual Effects in "Hugo"


The visual effects in Hugo are pretty incredible. Much of the acting work was done on real, practical sets built specially for the movie; however even the most complex sets needed some digital finishing.  I had to place the visual effects credits for this movie at the end of this post, because the credits are HUGE. Amazingly, each of those people listed below had to be on the same page for what they were trying to accomplish in this film, and it was done beautifully.

The frame above shows quite clearly a few visual aspects which were finished off by the visual effects crew. In conjunction with the set designer, the visual effect of closing in the roof of the station had to be accomplished by the Gestalt principle of closure. These settings needed to be drawn on computer to match the physical sets, but also fade neatly into a stylized, almost whimsical steampunk look.

A before and after still from a scene later in the movie (though in the same space as the clip we chose) shows how much was done to make the station look complete:

(All images copyright © 2011 Paramount Pictures.)

From the perspective of design, the visual effects crew needed to take the lines and perspective of the basic set design and continue them in order to build the context of the film. In almost every one of these scenes, the use of line shows depth.

As with the set and costume design, the visual effects artists used color very carefully, in order to keep the mood of the overall scene.  Colors in the train station are muted, while maintaining a certain warm glow.

Form is also important, and comes into play in many of the scenes.  You see many geometric shapes in the station, from the columns to the lights to the speakers and down to the windows and archways.  The forms are three dimensional and the way they are lit make the 3-D space very real.

The visual effects designers also needed to play on a few different contexts to make this scene work.  Psychologically, the visual effects artists make you feel like you’ve been knocked down like the girl in the scene, using vertical lines and a vertical vanishing point while showing her face looking up.  It seems like it shouldn’t work, but it is very effective:

In the scene above, you also get a glimpse at how the visual effects artists used figure-ground relationships, using the peoples feet as the figures and the ground as the roof behind them.

The visual effects artists also use texture well; creating a cold, hard feeling atmosphere, accentuated by the use of real (and CGI) steam.

Visual Effects by 

Jan Adamczyk lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Matt Akey archival conversion producer: Legend 3D
Danny Albano lead restoration artist: Technicolor Restoration Services
Casey Allen visual effects: Lola VFX
Ana Maria Alvarado animator: Pixomondo
Holli Alvarado visual effects: Lola VFX
Xuzhen An compositor: Pixomondo
Jaroslaw Ancuta roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Katarzyna Ancuta compositor: Pixomondo
Daphne Apellanes-Ackerson matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Oliver Arnold visual effects division coordinator: Pixomondo
Ando Avila compositor: Pixomondo
Steve Baker animator: Pixomondo (as Stephen Baker)
Scott Balkcom visual effects: Lola VFX
James Ballan props: model unit
Craig Barron matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Katrina Barton visual effects coordinator
Geeta Basantani matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Tyler Bennink archival conversion production supervisor: Legend #D
Irina Bennoit cg artist: Pixomondo
Brian Berringer matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Annalyn Betinol roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Jason Bidwell compositor: Pixomondo
Jürgen Bilstein lighting shading and texturing: Pixomondo
Michelle Blok lead previs artist: Nvizage
Johannes Bogenhauser compositor: Pixomondo
Sebastian Bommersheim compositor: Pixomondo
Rene Borst matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Anthony Bowden visual effects assistant
Colin Brady visual effects division supervisor: Pixomondo
Franz Brandstaetter compositor: Pixomondo (as Franz Brandstä’tter)
Anne Marie Breedlove stereo compositor: Legend 3D
Simon Britnell visual effects division supervisor: Pixomondo
John Brubaker compositor: Pixomondo
Boris Bruchhaus visual effects artist: Pixomondo
Erik Bruhwiler visual effects: Lola VFX
Linus Burghardt compositor: Pixomondo
Tom Burton restoration director: Technicolor Restoration Services
Sebastian Butenberg sequence CG supervisor: Pixomondo
Erin Collins Butler matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Hamza Butt cg artist: Pixomondo
Miguel Diaz Cachero lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Paul Campion matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Matt Candido python developer: Legend 3D
Yingchun Cao cg artist: Pixomondo
Curtis Carlson stereo compositor: Legend 3D
Irfan Celik lighting shading and texturing: Pixomondo
Craig Cesareo pipeline technical director: Legend 3D
Martin Chamney previs supervisor: Nvizage
Chris Chang cg artist: Pixomondo
Red Charyszyn visual effects editor
Zhongwei Chen matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Cheng Cheng roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Karen Cheng compositor: Pixomondo
Yong Cheng matchmove artist: Pixomondo
Ricky Cheung compositor: Pixomondo
Emma Brofjorden Chevin compositor: Pixomondo (as Emma Brofjorden)
Wally Chin roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Frederick Cholewa visual effects division coordinator: Pixomondo
Gotthardt-Mills Chris lidar scanning technician
Darren Christie compositor: Pixomondo
August Christman stereo artist: Legend 3D
Genevieve Claire visual effects production assistant: Pixomondo
Trent Claus visual effects: Lola VFX
Ryan Cleveland senior stereoscopic compositor
Miodrag Colombo lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Noemie Cruciani compositor: Pixomondo
Enrico Damm lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Iacopo Di Luigi cg artist: Pixomondo
Doris Ding roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
John Dinh compositor: Pixomondo
Damian Doennig visual effects division supervisor: Pixomondo
Tobias Dommer cg artist: Pixomondo
Boris T. Duepré division visual effects producer: Pixomondo
Julien Dupuy matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Joseph Eapen matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Stephen Edwards roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Volker Engel visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory
Denny Ertanto compositor: Pixomondo
Tyler Esselstrom lighting shading and texturing: Pixomondo
Chris Evans matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Richard Ewan miniatures painter
Thilo Ewers matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Maeve Eydmann matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Hsuanyi Fang matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Dean Faulder cg artist: Pixomondo
Katja Federkiel character rigging and massive visual effects artist: Pixomondo
Jackie Fenton stereo compositor: Legend 3D
Jan Fiedler visual effects division producer: Pixomondo
Adam Figielski matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Brenda Finster visual effects coordinator
Tommaso Fioretti compositor: Pixomondo
Larkin Flynn compositor: Pixomondo
David Fonseca matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Jerome Fournier matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Florian Franke compositor: Pixomondo
Richard Frazer compositor: Pixomondo
Trey Freeman restoration team: Technicolor Restoration Services
Micah Gallagher compositor: Pixomondo
Christoph Gaudl matchmove artist: Pixomondo
Sabrina Gerhardt division vfx producer: Pixomondo
Adam Ghering stereoscopic compositing supervisor: Legend 3D
Jack Shahram Ghoulian visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory (as Jack Ghoulian)
Roger Gibbon lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Matt Gibson previs artist: Nvizage
Mike Gilbert previs artist: Nvizage
Roy Goode visual effects
John Goodson matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Azzard Gordon matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Markus Graf lighting artist: Pixomondo
Matthew Gratzner visual effects supervisor: New Deal Studios
Ron Griswold visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory
Ben Grossmann visual effects supervisor
Jörn Großhans visual effects division supervisor: Pixomondo
Tobias Gruenberger cg artist: Pixomondo
Stefan Guenther matchmove artist: Pixomondo
Metin Gungor matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Benson Guo roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Divya Gupta compositor: Pixomondo
Ebru Gönül compositor: Pixomondo
Brian Hajek visual effects: Lola VFX
Thierry Hamel matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Éric Hamel matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital (as Eric Hamel)
Qian Han compositor: Pixomondo
Marc Hankel cg artist: Pixomondo
Lisa Hansen visual effects division producer: Pixomondo
Steven Hansen lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Giles Harding visual effects data supervisor
Joe Harkins visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory (as Joseph M. Harkins)
Kohl Harrington visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory
Brian Hartshorn production assistant: Legend 3D
Stuart Haskayne virtual camera operator: Nvizage
Chao He matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
John Healy restoration team: Technicolor Restoration Services
Rens Heeren cg artist: Pixomondo
Jan Heinze division visual effects producer: Pixomondo
Gunnar Heiss compositor: Pixomondo
Alex Henning digital effects supervisor
Xiaoyong Hu matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Jill Hunt archival conversion stereographer: Legend 3D
Alexander Hupperich lighting shading and texturing: Pixomondo
Annemieke Loomis Hutchins matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital (as Annemieke Loomis Hutchins)
Martin Höhnle matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Brad Isdrab technical support
Veress Kovács István matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo (as Istvan Veress Kovacs)
Laura Jacobs roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Jin-Ho Jeon cg artist: Pixomondo
Hongyan Ji roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Leo Jia lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Marc Joos cg artist: Pixomondo
Vanja Jozinovic matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Martin Jurado lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Perry Kain senior visual effects coordinator: Pixomondo
Eric Kasanowski cg artist: Pixomondo
Tomi Keeling encoder technician
Elaine Kelley visual effects coordinator
Marcel Kern visual effects artist: Pixomondo
Katharina Keßler visual effects coordinator: Pixomondo
Tricia Kim matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Paul King visual effects division producer: Pixomondo
Eva Kniel compositor: Pixomondo
John Knoll visual effects supervisor: ILM
Katharina Koepke visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory
Leonid Kogan matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Ivan Kokov compositor: Pixomondo
Anthony Kramer digital compositor: Pixomondo
Derek Krauss matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Patrick Kreuser compositor: Pixomondo
Robert Kriegel matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Lon Krung cg artist: Pixomondo
Norman Krüsmann cg artist: Pixomondo
Roger Kupelian matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Thilo Kuther visual effects executive producer: Pixomondo
Clive Lamming consultant: train
Richard S. Lee matte painter: Pixomondo
Seung Hyung Lee visual effects technical director
Katie Legato visual effects assistant (as Katherine Legato)
Robert Legato visual effects supervisor
Max Leonard visual effects: Lola VFX
Sebastian Leutner division visual effects producer: Pixomondo
Justin Lewers character rigging and massive visual effects artist: Pixomondo
Jing Li visual effects division producer: Pixomondo
Li Li matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Wenkang Li compositor: Pixomondo
Kai Lin cg artist: Pixomondo
Kristin Link stereo production assistant: Legend 3D
Noll Linsangan compositor: Pixomondo
Heng Liu cg artist: Pixomondo
Liwen Liu compositor: Pixomondo
Michael Lloyd plate photography
Jesse Looney visual effects production assistant: Pixomondo
Leon Loukeris visual effects artist: Pixomondo
Simon Lower lighting artist: Pixomondo
Philip Lücke compositor: Pixomondo
Chenchen Ma matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Hugh Macdonald virtual camera developer: Nvizage
Michal Maciejewski visual effects artist: Pixomondo
Thomas Maksymowiz matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Christoph Malessa division vfx producer: Pixomondo
Jeffrey Manchester production coordinator: Legend 3D
Kim Mandilag archival conversion lead depth artist: Legend 3D
Javier Marcheselli visual effects editor
Irene Martin visual effects production assistant: Pixomondo
Sven Martin visual effects division supervisor: Pixomondo
Rob May stereoscopic correction artist (uncredited)
Björn Mayer matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Steven McKendry visual effects division producer: Pixomondo
Michael Meagher visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory (as Tony Meagher)
Oscar Medina character rigging and massive visual effects artist: Pixomondo
Pieter Mentz visual effects division supervisor: Pixomondo (as Pieter Mientz)
Ian Menzies encoder technician
Christoph Metzger compositor: Pixomondo
Brian David Miller visual effects editor: Pixomondo
Toshiko Miura compositor: Pixomondo
Jeanette Monero roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Didier Muenza lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Patrick Paul Mullane visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory (as Patrick Mullane)
Dennis Murillo visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory
Karen M. Murphy visual effects producer (as Karen Murphy-Mundell)
Conrad Murrey visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory
Sven Müller cg artist: Pixomondo (as Sven Muller)
Torsten Neuendorf compositor: Pixomondo
Alex Nice matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Talon Nightshade visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory
Lukas Niklaus matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Thomas Nittmann visual effects: Lola VFX
Cameron Noble matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Travis Nobles compositor: Pixomondo
Jonas Noell lighting shading and texturing: Pixomondo
Philip Nussbaumer compositor: Pixomondo
Jan Oberhauser compositor: Pixomondo
Maria Eugenia Ocantos visual effects artist: Pixomondo
Viktorija Ogureckaja visual effects division coordinator: Pixomondo
Robert Olsson visual effects: Lola VFX (as Rob Olsson)
Zofie Olsson roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Mihaela Orzea visual effects division supervisor: Pixomondo
Tobias Ott visual effects artist: Pixomondo
Natasha Ozoux digital producer: Pixomondo
Emanuele Paris cg artist: Pixomondo
Saku Partamies visual effects division supervisor: Pixomondo
Tobias Pfeiffer visual effects division editor: Pixomondo
Mark Pinheiro compositor: Pixomondo
Caroline Pires compositor: Pixomondo
Ed Plant compositor: Pixomondo
Armando Plata visual effects division producer: Pixomondo
Leszek Plichta cg artist: Pixomondo
Konstantinos Pontikidis matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Eddie Porter compositor: titles, Big Film Design
Hannes Poser visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory
Nina Pries compositor: Pixomondo
Franzisca Puppe visual effects division producer: Pixomondo
Ingo Putze visual effects art director: Pixomondo
Xiaogang Qi cg artist: Pixomondo
Darren Quah matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Zhennan Quan matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Sean Raffel lighting shading and texturing: Pixomondo
Mahmoud Rahnama lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Lance Ranzer roto/paint supervisor: Pixomondo
Salahuddin Razul roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Max Riess compositor: Pixomondo
Rick Rische visual effects art director: Pixomondo
Christian Rivera data management: Legend 3D / render technical assistant: Legend 3D
Duncan Rochfort visual effects editor: Pixomondo
Ken Rogerson matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Lesley Rooney lighting shading and texturing: Pixomondo
Alessandro Sabbioni lighting artist: Pixomondo
Stephanie Saillard compositor: Pixomondo
Jared Sandrew archival conversion supervisor: Legend 3D
David Sanger visual effects producer: New Deal Studios
Kosta Saric visual effects editor
Sven Sauer matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Benjamin Scabell compositor: Pixomondo
Marlies Schacherl visual effects division coordinator: Pixomondo
Ingo Schachner animator: Pixomondo
Thomas Schad stereo compositor: Legend 3D
Stephan Schaefholz compositor: Pixomondo
Boris Schmidt cg artist: Pixomondo
John Schratz cg artist: Pixomondo
Crystle Schrecengost paint/roto artist: Pixomondo
Walter Schulz character rigging and massive visual effects artist: Pixomondo
Kino Scialabba lead matte painter: Legion Entertainment
Abigail Scollay compositor: Pixomondo
Benjamin Seide division visual effects supervisor: Pixomondo
Alessandra Serrano visual effects division coordinator: Pixomondo
Ben Sharp matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Yvette Shum visual effects division coordinator: Pixomondo
Josh Singer visual effects: Lola VFX
Jonathan Skabla titles stereographer: Big Film Design
Todd R. Smith matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Julia Smola visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory
Ryan T. Smolarek visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory (as Ryan Smolarek)
Simia Song roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Donna Sousa matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Rony Soussan visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory
Tilo Spalke lighting shading and texturing: Pixomondo
Adrian Spanna visual effects video assist
Christopher Stack i/o manager: Pixomondo
Christian Stadach compositor: Pixomondo
Juri Stanossek visual effects division supervisor: Pixomondo
Chris Stenner visual effects division supervisor: Pixomondo
Gareth Stevenson matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Rainer Stolle matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Jonathan Stone visual effects producer: Pixomondo
Chris Stoski matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Moritz Strothmann compositor: Pixomondo
Jonas Stuckenbrock compositor: Pixomondo
Jialin Su matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Chen Sun compositor: Pixomondo
Jeremiah Sweeney visual effects: Lola VFX
Greg Szafranski cg artist: Pixomondo
Emerick Tackett layout artist: Pixomondo / lead matchmove artist: Pixomondo
Katie-Louise Talbot cg artist: Pixomondo (as Katie Talbot)
Martin Tallosy compositor: Pixomondo
Kenny Tam visual effects division supervisor: Pixomondo
Jiabin Tan lighting shading and texturing: Pixomondo
Mark Joey Tang compositor: Pixomondo
Britton Taylor matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Rodrigo Teixeira lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Elena Topouzoglou compositor: Pixomondo
Morgan Trotter matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Michael Underwood restoration team: Technicolor Restoration Services
Pieter Van Houte visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory
Phi Van Le visual effects division coordinator: Pixomondo
John D. Vaughan visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory (as John Vaughan)
Rickey Verma compositor: Pixomondo
Marion Voignier compositor: Pixomondo
Sören Volz compositor: Pixomondo
Michael Vorberg compositor: Pixomondo
Cristina Vozian roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
James Wakefield systems administrator
Bill Wang visual effects coordinator: Pixomondo
Xiaowei Wang lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Yanlin Wang roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Adam Watkins cg supervisor: Pixomondo
Feiyi Wei matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Kaifeng Wei roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Marc Weigert visual effects and digital environments: Uncharted Territory
Johannes Weiss matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Martin Wellstein lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Adam Wesierski matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Mariusz Wesierski matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Tobias Wiesner compositor: Pixomondo
Edson Williams visual effects: Lola VFX
Stefan Willisch cg artist: Pixomondo
Sally Wilson cg artist: Pixomondo
Marco Wilz matte painting and environmental artist: Pixomondo
Patrick Wolf head of pipeline: Pixomondo
Tzuen Wu lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Klaus Wuchta lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Shanshan Xie visual effects division coordinator: Pixomondo
Runlin Xiong lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Dongyue Yang roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Zhao Yang roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Siyun Yi visual effects production assistant: Pixomondo
Shuichi Yoshida matte painting supervision and visual effects: Matte World Digital
Greg Young lighting shading and texturing: Pixomondo (as Greg Meeres-Young)
Yonrong Yu visual effects division coordinator: Pixomondo
Oliver Zangenberg lead artist and technical director: Pixomondo
Fabio Zangla visual effects division supervisor: Pixomondo
Luca Zappala head of effects: Pixomondo UK
Joe Zarceno restoration team: Technicolor Restoration Services
Robert Zeltsch visual effects division supervisor: Pixomondo
Momo Zhan visual effects division coordinator: Pixomondo
Gwen Zhang compositor: Pixomondo
Le Zhang compositor: Pixomondo
Peng Zhang matchmove artist: Pixomondo
Wei Zhang matchmove artist: Pixomondo
Zhixin Zhang compositor: Pixomondo
Zhuotao Zhang cg artist: Pixomondo
Zihao Zhang matchmove/layout artist: Pixomondo
Jianghong Zhu compositor: Pixomondo
Justin Zhu cg artist: Pixomondo
Huajing Zhuo roto/paint artist: Pixomondo
Christoph Zollinger visual effects division producer: Pixomondo
Jiarun Zou compositor: Pixomondo
Xinguo Zou compositor: Pixomondo
Andrew Ainscow automaton crew (uncredited)
Anjel Alcaraz visual effects (uncredited)
Troy Alexiadis visual effects artist (uncredited)
Sean Araki systems administrator (uncredited)
Laya Armian associate visual effects producer (uncredited)
Nicole Arnell rotoscope artist (uncredited)
Andrew Astengo visual effects artist (uncredited)
James Aston lighting technical director (uncredited)
Melissa Austria stereo production supervisor (uncredited)
Daniel Avery stereo compositor: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Sandeep Avuthu lighting td: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Wenting Bai compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Zheng Bao compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Fabian Barreto production assistant: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Brandon Bartlett digital effects supervisor: With A Twist Studio (uncredited)
Nathan Behmlander stereoscopic compositor (uncredited)
Stephanie Bell digital compositor (uncredited)
Emma Berkeley texture artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Florin Boieriu compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Falk Boje 3d artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
John Bowers compositing supervisor: With A Twist Studio (uncredited)
Tatjana Bozinovski compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Erik Bratlien visual effects artist (uncredited)
Daniel Brenner 3d intern: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Christopher E. Brown digital effects artist (uncredited)
Amy Brunolli visual effects artist (uncredited)
Andreas Bundenthal cg fx artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Jan Burda compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Heiko Burkardsmaier business and legal affairs: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Shannan Burkley matte painter (uncredited)
David Burton visual effects supervisor: With A Twist Studio (uncredited)
Brendan Byrd visual effects production assistant (uncredited)
Allan Cabal animator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Gabe Cervantes visual effects artist (uncredited)
Philip Chaoui generalist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Alex Collings data wrangler (uncredited)
Simon Coombs render farm supervisor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Kevin Crandell visual effects editor: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Oliver Cubbage digital artist (uncredited)
Marcos De Barros modeler: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Christian Deiß visual effects technical director: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Max Dennison head of environments: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Jonathon Dickey technician (uncredited)
Joseph DiValerio post-vis artist (uncredited)
Tom Driscoll visual effects editor: Legend3D (uncredited)
Julien Ducenne digital compositor (uncredited)
Anthony Dunifer lead stereo artist: Legend 3 D (uncredited)
Philipp Edelhäuser 3d intern: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Sergej Eichmann 3d generalist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Nino Ellington technical assistant (uncredited)
Theresa Ellis compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Marco Aurélio Engelmann Santos compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
John Paul Escobar visual effects editor: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Duane Eues visual effects artist (uncredited)
Nathan Evans division lighting/rendering assistant supervisor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Sabine Ewers-Schorr recruiter: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Jonathan Faber model maker (uncredited)
Felicia Faden matte painter (uncredited)
Marco Fanari matte painter: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Ryan Fear motion control producer (uncredited)
Forest P. Fischer digital set designer: New Deal Studios (uncredited)
Felix Fissel senior it manager: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Marvin Fonacier systems administrator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Lianne Forbes division matchmove supervisor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Gabriel Franke cg artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Dean Frater digital artist (uncredited)
Florian Friedmann animator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Bradley Gaines compositor (uncredited)
Matthaeus Gamroth cg fx artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Shannon Blake Gans visual effects executive producer: New Deal Studios (uncredited)
Feng Gao compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Matt Garner visual effects editor (uncredited)
Harry S. George systems administrator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Cyrus Jay Gladstone visual effects artist (uncredited)
Brittany Gonzales administrative assistant: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Mitch Gonzalez 3d generalist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Chris Gooch previs artist (uncredited)
Trevor Graciano visual effects (uncredited)
Maximilian Gründl compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Hien Hung Ha system administrator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Miles Hall visual effects artist (uncredited)
Pam Hammarlund visual effects producer (uncredited)
Derek Hanson digital compositor (uncredited)
Brian Hartshorn stereo production assistant: Legend 3 D (uncredited)
Milan Heinzmann editorial intern: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Sarah K. Hellström visual effects line producer (uncredited)
Jonathan Henry visual effects production assistant (uncredited)
Yasemin Hepguler compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Nicholas Hiegel qc supervisor (uncredited)
Emiko Hikita roto/paint artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Annika Hirsch vfx coordinator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Dennis Ho compositing trainee: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Travis Hoecker asset technician: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Brian Holmes systems administrator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Paul Hormis fx artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Duff Chung-Pu Hsiao compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Anna Huang stereo coordinator: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Danny Huynh visual effects (uncredited)
Hansoo Im lighting artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
David Ireland visual effects (uncredited)
Florian Jackl systems administrator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Andrea Jamiel render wrangler: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Jeffrey Jasper digital effects supervisor: New Deal Studios (uncredited)
Henry Jefferson division compositing lead: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Chao Jiang compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Chawalit Jirattikansakul rotomation artist (uncredited)
YeYoung Jung character artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Dan Katcher character artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Patrick Keenan compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Brooke Keesling visual effects production coordinator: New Deal Studios (uncredited)
Matthew Kemper lead stereoscopic compositor: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Lucy Killick visual effects producer (uncredited)
Dan Knight compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Keith Kolod visual effects (uncredited)
Jason Kolowski model maker (uncredited)
Christian Korneck systems manager: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Michael Kowalski division visual effects producer: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Sebastian Kral pipeline developer: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Slav Kravchenko matte painter: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Hannes Krieger cg fx intern: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Claudia Lachnitt vfx coordinator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Paul LaFond stereo conversion artist (uncredited)
Michael Lankes division compositing lead: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Sebastian Lauer 3d artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Julius Lechner digital effects artist (uncredited)
Tim LeDoux lead compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Grant Lee stereo compositor: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Nicolas Leu compositing intern: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Jenny Leupold cg intern: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Qian Li compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Davell Lee Libbett visual effects coordinator (uncredited)
Katie Linahon production coordinator: New Deal Studios (uncredited)
Brendan Llave visual effects (uncredited)
Michael Lloyd visual effects intern (uncredited)
Jason Lodas visual effects: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Lara Lom visual effects coordinator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Augusto Lombardi fx td: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Raymon Macahilas visual effects artist (uncredited)
Ben Mackey systems administrator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Celeste Madrigal visual effects artist (uncredited)
Keywan Mahintorabi compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Maria Malo-Molina administrative assistant: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Tyler Marino visual effects (uncredited)
Tony Masiello asset technician: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Knut Matten system administrator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Marianne McCarney visual effects artist (uncredited)
Adam McKee stereo compositor: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Russell McLean stop frame producer (uncredited)
Sven Mecklenbroich editorial intern: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Christophe Metz compositing intern: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Steffen Metzner editorial intern: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Mohsen Mousavi division fx td lead: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Knuth Möde lighting/surfacing artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Dominik Müller matchmove intern: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Bernd Nalbach animator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Adrian Neub division it manager: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Nicolette Newman texture artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Vincent Niebla additional stereographer: Legend 3 D (uncredited)
James P. Noon tracking (uncredited)
Brett Northcutt digital matte artist (uncredited)
Matt Nowacki digital artist: With a Twist Studio (uncredited)
John F.K. Parenteau vfx executive producer: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Michael Parkin automaton crew (uncredited)
Steve Parsons compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Joshua Perry associate stereo supervisor: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Sandy Phetchamphone visual effects (uncredited)
Johannes Pink pipeline td: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Rob Price digital artist (uncredited)
Ben Record model maker (uncredited)
Jason Reese it help desk lead: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Christoph Reinfels roto artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Neil Riley stop frame supervisor (uncredited)
Erasmo Romero stereo compositor: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Anthony Ruey coordinator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Kayte Sabicer model maker (uncredited)
Imran Sajid lighting artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Avi Salem compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Marc-Andre Samson concept artist (uncredited)
Daniel Sandoval-Guillen lead stereo compositor: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Arutyun Artur Sayan lighting artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Kai Schadwinkel generalist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Adrian Scherger visual effects editor: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Nabil Schiantarelli compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Silam Schmidt recruiting manager: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Patrick Schuler fx artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Walter Schulz massive td: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Sebastian Schäfer development: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Sebastian Schütt compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Elaina Scott animator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Jacopo Sebastiani previs artist: Nvizage (uncredited)
Ira Shain previs animator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Jason Shulman animator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Sven Skoczylas 3d lighting/shading trainee: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Jakris Smittant visual effects coordinator (uncredited)
Jesse Squire python developer: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Sabrina Steinert 3d trainee: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Tim Stern compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Yesod Stone data manager: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Sungwook Su fx artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Kain Suwannaphin visual effects artist: New Deal Studios (uncredited)
Frank Synowicz stereo conversion artist (uncredited)
Sharellis Tatis administrative assistant: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Michael Thalmann head of it: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Jeremy Therrien technical assistant (uncredited)
Gavyn Thompson lighting artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Ted Trabucco visual effects artist (uncredited)
Duc Minh Tran animator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Tong Tran generalist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Jason Ullrich compositor (uncredited)
Dirk Valk 3d animator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
David Vivaldini compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Christian Vogt visual effects executive producer: Pixomondo (uncredited)
James Wakefield it/systems adminstrator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Sonja Waldraff divison human resources manager: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Darren Walsh animator (uncredited)
Nancy Wang supervising visual effects editor: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Yang Wang matchmove artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Loicia Ware visual effects (uncredited)
Mathias Wegert compositing intern: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Henry Weickert pipeline developer trainee: Pixomondo (uncredited)
M. Alexander Weller matte painter: Matte World Digital (uncredited)
Aaron Williams visual effects (uncredited)
J. Adam Williams stereo artist: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Shanese Williams asset technician: Legend 3D (uncredited)
Jason Wilson visual effects artist (uncredited)
Sascha Wolf editorial-i/o: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Eddy Wolfson stereo compositor: L3D (uncredited)
Jonathan Wright lead stereo artist (uncredited)
Guillaume Wyatt 3d lighting/shading artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Tou Yeng Xiong rotomation artist (uncredited)
Tolga Yalkir it systems administrator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Mingzhe Yang i/o coordinator: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Ahmed Yousry 3d generalist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Yangyang Yu compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Jia Zhao compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Anton Zheltyakov compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Bin Zheng compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Christian Zurcher fx artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
Thilo Zweihoff compositing intern: Pixomondo (uncredited)


Reducing Carbon-Fuel Consumption in Oakland, CA

Information about Oakland’s past and current efforts related to sustainability as quoted in this post can be found in this report:
http://www2.oaklandnet.com/oakca1/groups/pwa/documents/report/oak042133.pdf

Reducing Carbon-based Fuel Consumption
Carbon-based fuel consumption affects every area of how we live. Most people’s minds immediately think about their cars and reducing their gasoline usage, but it extends much further than that.

While technology has developed to the point of many alternative fuel sources, the predominate method of power generation is oil/gas based. While changes come at a significant price tag, there are apps and hardware available to help people be aware of their energy consumption.  One California company, Nest, has already started releasing products like their thermostat which intelligently learn when you are using energy and when you’re not and adjust your home’s temperature so that it’s only using energy at times you need it.  It can even be adjusted to avoid peak times.

The easiest application of “social” media to reducing carbon based fuel consumption would be in the spectrum of our driving and traffic habits.  An MIT project, called CO2GO connects citizens together in the arena of their CO2 emissions from their travels.  According to it’s website, it helps citizens make “smarter individual transportation choices to collectively reduce carbon emissions in cities…by automatically detecting your mode of transportation…while tracking the distance covered.”

Basically, it calculates your CO2 emissions based on your individual route and mode(s) of transportation, and can show you a better way to get where you are headed and share your routes with others so they can adjust their travel behaviors.

Oakland has also recently become the #7 city in the nation for bicycle commuting, having spent a significant amount of money on a “complete streets” initiative, providing a design standard that makes transportation safe for bikers, walkers and vehicles.

Oakland does have a loose plan on what they’d like to see happen, in terms of reducing carbon fuel consumption (and greenhouse gas emissions).  Below are some of the goals they have set to accomplish by the year 2020:

Here’s where it is interesting.  Below are the ways they are hoping to track their goals.  While they do list that they want to expand content on the website, they don’t really talk about how they’re measuring them.  I don’t think people are going to look at a website, you’ll have to integrate the awareness into their daily lives somehow.  That’s where the CO2GO application comes into play.


The catalyst for any change is awareness. If social (connected) media can affect one thing about sustainability, it would be awareness.  I’m not talking about facebook posts or campaigns  though that may be part of it.  I’m talking about the kind of data listed above: the awareness that someone who lives near to you took a slightly different way to work and burned half the amount of carbon fuels that you did in your car; the awareness that turning down your air conditioner 4 degrees in the late afternoon forces them to work an oil power generator twice as much releasing twice as much CO2 into the atmosphere.